History of Utica, New York

History of Utica, New York

Utica, the county seat of Oneida County, is situated in the Mohawk Valley of upstate New York, approximately midway between Buffalo and New York City. It was abandoned before the Revolutionary War.Settlers began arriving in 1773, and the village became an important stop for settlers heading farther west. It is presumed to be in reference to an ancient city of that name in Roman North Africa.The city was incorporated as a village in 1798, the same year that Oneida County was organized. After the Erie Canal arrived in 1825, Utica grew quickly and became a city in 1832. Utica College, a private college established by Syracuse University, opened in 1946.Frank W. When textile manufacturers began a gradual shift towards production in the South after World War II, Utica diversified its manufacturing base.


Utica

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

Utica, city, seat (1798) of Oneida county, central New York, U.S., on the Mohawk River and New York State Canal System, 45 miles (72 km) east of Syracuse. The first settlers were Dutch and Palatinate Germans, and in 1758 the British built Old Fort Schuyler, near the site of an ancient Oneida Indian council stone. Destroyed by the Indian-Tory raid in 1776, the early village was rebuilt and connected by stagecoach to Albany (1793) and by river to Schenectady.

Incorporated as the village of Utica (its name was drawn from a hat) in 1798, it grew as a textile-industrial centre following the completion of the Erie Canal in 1825. In 1879 F.W. Woolworth opened his first store in Utica, selling only merchandise costing five cents or less (the store failed the same year). Diversified manufacturing developed after World War II and now includes medical and surgical equipment, wood furniture, jewelry boxes and desk accessories, power transmissions (aerospace), and textile reinforcements for tires.

The city is surrounded by dairylands with truck farms to the west. Mohawk Valley Community College of the State University of New York system and the Utica College of Syracuse University were established there in 1946, and the State University of New York Institute of Technology at Utica/Rome in 1966. The Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute (incorporated as a school of art in 1919) maintains a museum. Utica is the site of the Mohawk Valley Psychiatric Center, the Masonic Home and Health Facility, and several hospitals. Inc. city, 1832. Pop. (2000) 60,651 Utica-Rome Metro Area, 299,896, (2010) 62,235 Utica-Rome Metro Area, 299,397.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Kenneth Pletcher, Senior Editor.


A Brief History

Utica College's history reaches back to the 1930s when Syracuse University operated extension courses in the Utica, N.Y. area.

UC was established thanks to the efforts of business and community leaders in the Mohawk Valley who saw a need for such an institution. In 1946, Syracuse University launched Utica College. Originally, the school was located in a section of downtown Utica known as Oneida Square. In 1961, the school moved to its current site off of Burrstone Road.

Although the College became a financially and legally independent institution in 1995, UC announced its final transition to full independence in the fall of 2008. Since 1998, the College has offered graduate degree programs, including master's and doctorate options in a broad range of fields.

Adapted from: Pioneering Generations by Professor Emeritus John C. Behrens, which chronicles the College's first 50 years.

Learn more about UC's beginnings in the book Reflections: The Early Years of Utica College by Professor Emeritus Virgil C. Crisafulli


Utica Parks and Parkway System Timeline

Forest Hill Cemetery formally opened in June 1850. Almerin Hotchkiss (noted American landscape designer) integrated curving paths, uneven terrain, ponds, plantings, and roads into the plan which emblemized the spirit of the rural cemetery movement.

Thomas R. Proctor initiates the development of the park system for the City of Utica when he opens 60 acres on the grounds of his Bagg's Hotel Farm for public recreation.

T.R. Proctor promotes urban improvement and the realization of the City Beautiful movement in Utica when he gives a speech before the Chamber of Commerce advocating paving all streets, planting trees, and establishing playgrounds and parks.

Thomas R. Proctor acquires large farms along the southern border of the City of Utica with the intention of uniting the properties into a city park system.

Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., speaks at the Utica Academy and advocates the establishment of urban parks. Thomas Proctor consults with the Olmsted Brothers Firm in Brookline, Massachusetts. The firm begins creating plans for locating roads, paths, gardens, fields, active recreational spaces, terraces and woodlands to shape the lands of the developing Utica Park System.

Thomas R. Proctor introduces local dignitaries to the parks he is developing for the City of Utica by driving them around the green spaces in a cavalcade of automobiles.

The park lands become more accessible to Utica's residents through transportation improvements. The public rides trolley cars south on Mohawk Street to Pleasant Street. Automobiles enter the parks via the new Parkway, which is completed from Genesee Street to Elm Street. Eighty acres of Roscoe Conkling Park is allocated for a zoological society (now the Utica Zoo).

Swan Fountain, designed by sculptor Frederick William MacMonnies, is installed at the Parkway and Elm Streets in memory of Utica attorney Robert Swan. This is the first of what eventually becomes 14 monuments and statues sited along the entire length of the Memorial Parkway.

The Parkway is completed from Elm Street to Mohawk Street on a route parallel to Pleasant Street, an early city road built in the 19th-century.

Baron von Steuben Monument is dedicated at Genesee Street and the Parkway.

Spanish-American War Soldiers and Sailors Monument (The Hiker) is dedicated at the Parkway and Oneida Streets.

East of Mohawk Street, the new, wide, divided Parkway boulevard continues to the east through undeveloped farmland to link with Culver Avenue and the adjacent Frederick T. Proctor and Thomas R. Proctor Parks. Harry W. Roberts and his Tilden Realty Company engage the Olmsted Brothers Firm to create land use designs that result in a gracious residential neighborhood bordering the Parkway from Mohawk Street to Tilden Avenue.

Thomas R. Proctor Monument, designed by George T. Brewster, is dedicated on the Parkway.

Golfers welcome the opening of the municipal Valley View Golf Course adjacent to Roscoe Conkling Park. The course is designed in 1916 by Walter J. Travis, champion amateur golfer and golf course designer.

The bronze Eagle by sculptor Charles Keck, is located on elevated land near the cemetery boundary overlooking Roscoe Conkling park and the City of Utica.

General Casimir Pulaski Monument is located on the Parkway at Oneida Street.

The bronze bust of George Dunham by Filippo Scarlatta of Rome, Italy, is dedicated on the Parkway median, east of Holland Avenue.

The Works Progress Administration (WPA) improves recreational opportunities in Utica's parks by constructing 9 new tennis courts, 6 wading pools, 2 baseball diamonds, 1 new playground, a ski area, toboggan runs, fireplaces, a golf house, swimming pool, and bath house. Gravel and paved roads and parking lots are also added.

Golfers celebrate completion of the 50-acre expansion to Valley View Golf Course. Robert Trent Jones, the golf course architect, redesigns the course's fairways, shapes 18 new tees and greens, and adds a water system to irrigate the greens, which results in a challenging course that is widely appreciated for its beauty. These major improvements are funded almost entirely through the Works Project Administration.

A replica of the Statue of Liberty is placed on the Parkway near Elm Street.

Christopher Columbus, a statue designed by Enrico Arrighini, is dedicated on April 25, 1952, at its original location on Oriskany and Johns Streets in downtown Utica. It is re-dedicated on October 12, 1966, when it is moved to its present location at the Parkway and Mohawk Street.

The Vietnam War Memorial is dedicated at the Parkway and Holland Avenue.

The POW-MIA Memorial is dedicated on the Parkway, across from the tennis courts.

The World War I, World War II, Korean Conflict Memorial was dedicated on the Parkway, across from the tennis courts.

The Central New York Conservancy is established as a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization, with a mission of preserving and restoring Olmsted-designed green spaces in the Mohawk Valley.

The Central New York Conservancy conducts research in the Olmsted Archives at Fairsted (Brookline, MA) and discovers wealth of original documents pertaining to the creation of Utica's Parks & Parkway System, including original planting and tree lists developed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr.

A new map of FT Proctor Park is assembled, using documents from the Olmsted Archives that shows Olmsted, Jr.'s original planting plans for FT Proctor Park. The map is used to educate the community about the public parks system.

The Police and Firefighters Memorial is dedicated on the Parkway at Kemble Street.

The Swan Fountain, sculpted by renowned artist Frederick MacMonnies in 1910, is re-installed on the Memorial Parkway after a successful fund raising campaign by the Landmarks Society of Greater Utica. Major benefactors are William F. Locke and Family (Founder and President of the Central New York Conservancy), the Frank W. Baker Fund of The Community Foundation of Herkimer & Oneida Counties, Inc., ConMed, and the City of Utica). The project receives technical assistance from the Munson Williams Proctor Arts Institute and the Oneida County Historical Society.

Central New York Conservancy completes restoration work on FT Proctor Park Bath Houses, Lily Pond, and Stone Staircases originally designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr.

Central New York Conservancy hosts a gala in FT Proctor Park in honor of the Centennial of Utica's Olmsted-designed Parks and Parkway.

Utica Parks Commissioner, Dave Short, develops a nursery as part of a grant program funded by The NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, to cultivate Liberty Elms until they mature and may be planted on Genesee Street and the Memorial Parkway.

The Central New York Conservancy partners with the Utica City School District on a 3-year, $250,000 grant to implement Project SAVE (Safe Schools Against Violence in Education), a character education curriculum for 5th grade students. Other partners include the Utica Zoo, Utica Marsh, and the Oneida County Historical Society.

The Central New York Conservancy's application on behalf of the City of Utica and the Utica Parks and Parkway System is approved. Utica's Parks and Parkway System is named to the State and National Registers of Historic Places.

The Central New York Conservancy launches the "Adopt-A-Monument" program to encourage individuals and groups to participate in maintaining and enhancing the 14 monuments that line the center median on the Memorial Parkway from Genesee Street to Culver Avenue. Immediately, 6 monuments are adopted.

The Central New York Conservancy is awarded the John J. and Wilma B. Sinnott Conservation Award for 2009 by the Utica Zoo. The Conservancy is recognized for its work to enhance FT Proctor Park and the Memorial Parkway.

The 9/11 Memorial is dedicated at the corner of the Parkway and Sherman Drive, across from the Mohawk Valley Community College campus.

Central New York Conservancy holds first "I Love My Park Day" in Roscoe Conkling Park.

Planning and installation of the Peony Garden on the Memorial Parkway occurs. The Garden is created to honor the memory of benefactress and community volunteer Elizabeth F. Canfield.

Central New York Conservancy holds the first Arbor Day program and tree planting ceremony in FT and TR Proctor Parks.

The NJROTC of TR Proctor High School plants 96 flowering cherry trees along Culver Ave. near FT and TR Proctor Parks to commemorate Utica citizens who fought and died as members of the armed services.

The 2nd Annual "I Love My Park Day" is held in FT Proctor Park.

Ms. Erica Max is recognized for her volunteer service to the Central New York Conservancy and the instrumental role she played in creating the application that led to the Utica parks & Parkway System being named to the federal and state Registers of Historic Places in 2008.

Restoration of the tree canopy designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., begins when the CNY Conservancy plants 61 new trees in FT and TR Proctor Parks and along the Memorial Parkway, as part of its Arbor Day program and ceremony in concert with the City of Utica.

A new LED lighting system, underwritten by a grant by NYSERDA, is installed at 13 monuments on the Memorial Parkway by the City of Utica. The monuments will be lit from dusk to dawn.

The Central New York Conservancy begins re-designing and planting monument flower beds at monuments sponsored by individuals and groups as part of the ongoing Adopt-A-Monument program.

To welcome the Utica Comets back to their home ice for Games 3-5 in their quest for the Calder Cup, the Central New York Conservancy installs planter boxes at the Aud.

The Conservancy begins excavation to relocate the Peony Garden to a new site at Mohawk Street and the Parkway.

The Conservancy begins plans to restore two monuments on the Parkway – the Statue of Liberty and T.R. Proctor. The Swan Fountain is assessed to restore function to its fountain.

A new partnership with the Children's Museum will commence in Fall 2016, with programming for children and families brought to Utica's F.T. Proctor Park and to the Museum.

Peony Garden completed at new location at Mohawk Street and the Memorial Parkway. Benches are installed in memory of John Patrick McIntyre.

Restoration of the Statue of Liberty and Swan Fountain monuments is completed.

Property at 1641 Genesee Street is gifted to the Conservancy by the family of the late Albert Shaheen, M.D. for its first office.

Smartphone app developed for Utica Parks and Parkway System. App is available as a free download for iPhone and Android systems.

Central New York Conservancy awarded $125,000 "SAM" grant from NY State to restore condemned bridges in Utica's FT and TR Proctor Parks.

Mission
"Preserve and enhance the natural environment and features of current or historical significance through design, promoting the widest possible range of beneficial uses."

State & National Registers
Utica's Parks and Parkway System are listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places.
Click here to learn more about these registers


Old Photos, Pictures, Advertisements and Postcards from Utica, New York, USA


Utica, New York, USA

American Scenery,
by N.P. Willis, Illustrated by William Henry Bartlett, 1840
Artwork


Utica, New York, USA

Utica (N.Y.) Conservatory of Music

The Ladies' Home Journal
July 1898
Advertisement


Historical Pictures Of Utica

Pictured above is the building that is now Articulate Signs, located just to the east of the Shamrock Parking Lot.

Pictured above is the north east corner of Cass and Auburn which is now "Hogs Hollow".

Pictured above is the north side of Auburn Road, looking eastbound.

Pictured above is St. Lawrence Catholic School, located on Utica Road.

Pictured above is Trinity Lutheran Church on Van Dyke.

Pictured above is the West side of Cass Avenue, just north of Auburn Road.

Pictured above is the old Macomb Inn, located at the southwest corner of Cass and Summers


1805: Second Charter, Larger Fire Department


The Village of Utica, 1798


Old Fort Schuyler: Bagg's Hotel

When, in 1800, the Seneca Turnpike Company was organized, with a capital of $110,000, transportation to the West was assured. Stores and inns for the accomodation of these travelers sprang up like mushrooms. Bagg's Hotel was founded in 1794 by Moses Bagg of Westfield, Massachusetts, who came to Utica March 12, 1794. The next year he built a two-story inn on the corner of John and Main Streets. He conducted this tavern until his death in 1805, when it was taken over by his son, Moses Bagg, Jr., a surveyor and merchant. In 1812, the old building was torn down and the central section of the brick hotel built. It was conducted by Mr. Bagg, Jr. until 1836, when he sold it to the Bagg's Hotel Company.

Bagg's Hotel entertained many distinguished guests. Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Generals, Kings, etc. all often stayed at the Hotel. Abraham Lincoln even stopped here on his way to Washington as President-elect.

Thomas R. Proctor became proprietor in 1869 and remained in charge for twenty years. Grover Cleveland was a frequent visitor when governor, and while president. In 1890, Mr. Proctor retired and leased Bagg's Hotel to Captain D. M. Johnson who later put the hotel in the charge of his son, William T. Johnson, in 1896.


Utica

UTICA, commercial and industrial center in the Mohawk Valley in central New York State population (2002) 59,684, estimated Jewish population 1,100. Both the city and its Jewish population have declined from the 1970s the decline of Jews has been proportionately greater. Utica was first settled in 1786. The first Jew to make it his home was probably Abraham Cohen, who brought his family there in 1847 from Poland, the homeland of nearly all of Utica's early Jewish settlers. In 1848 the first synagogue, Beth Israel, was established with 20 families and by 1871 there were at least 225 Jewish family heads. Waves of Russian and Polish immigrants in the years after 1870 increased the number of Jews to 2,517 by 1920. Most of the early Jewish settlers were peddlers, while many of the post-1870 immigrants started out as manual workers. The peddlers generally went into wholesaling or branched out into new enterprises, and after 1915 Jews began to enter the professions. Not many Utican Jews became wealthy, but among those who did, several attained national prominence, such as Miles Rosenberg, president of the Miles Shoe Store chain, and David Bernstein, vice president of the Loew's theater concern. From the 1930s on, Jews began to take an increasingly active interest in local civic organizations. Between 1904 and 1958, 22 Jews held political office, including state judge H. Myron Lewis.

Utica's Jews have generally followed traditional Judaism. Congregation House of Jacob, founded in 1870, brought to Utica its first ordained rabbi, Moses Reichler, in 1897. An attempt to establish a Reform temple in 1903 ended in failure but in 1919 Temple Beth El, a Conservative synagogue, was founded with Rabbi Reuben Kaufman as its head. During the first quarter of the 20 th century Jews served their social needs through fraternal lodges, a YMHA and YWHA and a Workmen's Circle (1892). Local chapters of several organizations such as Hadassah (1917) and the Zionist Organization of America (1938) were formed and Jews contributed to World War I relief funds, the United Jewish Appeal and other charities. Through the initiative of Rabbi S. Joshua Kohn of Temple Beth El a Jewish Community Council was organized in 1933 to supervise and unify the many functions of the Jewish community. A Jewish Community Center was founded in 1955 and after 1949 the community's affairs were recorded in the Jewish Community News. In the early 21 st century the community still supported three synagogues Temple Beth El, Temple Emanu-El (Reform), and Congregation Zvi Jacob which is Orthodox.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

S.J. Kohn, Jewish Community, of Utica, 18471948 (1959).

Sources: Encyclopaedia Judaica. © 2008 The Gale Group. All Rights Reserved.


Early Production

In this section we'll look at some examples believed represent Utica's early production, with manufacturing dates ranging from 1895 up to around 1910.

Hall's Patent Nippers

Among the earliest tools produced by Utica were the Hall's Patent nippers, a popular style of compound-leverage end nippers capable of cutting hardened wire. The earliest of the Hall's patents actually dates to 1867, long before the founding of Utica Drop Forge. Subsequent improvements were patented in 1878, 1884, and 1890.

Utica [No. 3] Hall's Patent Compound-Leverage Nippers

Fig. 8 shows an early pair of Utica [No. 3] Hall's Patent compound-leverage nippers, stamped on the face with "Utica Drop Forge & Tool Co." arranged in a circle, with the 3-Ovals logo stamped below.

The overall length is 8.1 inches with the handles closed. The finish is plain steel, with extensive pitting due to rust.

The pliers are also marked with four patent dates, although the markings are only partially legible due to pitting. By reference to a later version of the tool, the patent dates are listed as "May, 67", "Nov. 78", "Feb. 84", and "Jan. 90".

The first patent date refers to patent #64,664, filed by T.G. Hall in 1866 and issued in 1867.

The second patent date refers to patent #209,677, filed by T.G. Hall in 1878 and issued later that year.

The third patent date refers to patent #294,034, filed by T.G. Hall in 1883 and issued in 1884.

The final patent date refers to patent #419,666, filed by T.G. Hall in 1881, but not issued until 1890.

Russell Patent Staple-Pulling Pliers

Utica Russell Patent Staple-Pulling Pliers

The next two figures show early examples of Utica's Russell Patent pliers, with minor differences in the markings.

Fig. 9 shows an early pair of Utica 10 inch staple-pulling pliers based on the Russell patents. The pliers are stamped "U.D.F. & T. Co." and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." near the pivot, and with the early 3-Ovals logo stamped on the lower handle (see lower right inset). The reverse is stamped with a patent notice "Pat. June 14, 92 Sept. 3, 1895" near the pivot, shown as a close-up in the middle right inset.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The first patent date refers to patent #477,005, filed by J. Heard in 1891 and later licensed by the Russell Hardware and Implement Company.

The second patent date refers to patent #545,537, filed by A.H. Russell in 1895. These two patents are collectively the "Russell Patents" licensed by Utica in their contract with the Russell company.

Fig. 10 shows another early pair of Utica 10 inch staple-pulling pliers, stamped "U.D.F. & T. Co." and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." near the pivot, with the early 3-Ovals logo stamped below (see lower right inset). The reverse is stamped with a patent notice "Pat. June 14, 92 Sept. 3, 1895" near the pivot, shown as a close-up in the middle right inset. (The second date is faintly stamped and difficult to read.)

The overall length is 10.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The patent dates refer to patents #477,005 and #545,537 respectively, as noted in the previous figure. Both patents were acquired by the Russell Hardware and Implement Company and licensed to Utica.

Early Button's Pattern Pliers

Button's Pattern pliers were a style of wire-cutters first introduced by J.M. King & Company in the late 1860s. These pliers were typically produced with two or three wire-cutting slots situated at the sides or between the jaws. Button's pliers were very popular during the 19th century and were probably among the earliest tools produced by Utica.

Utica Early 6 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers

Fig. 11 shows an early pair of Utica 6 inch Button's Pattern wire-cutting pliers, stamped "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." on the upper handle, with the 3-Ovals logo on the lower handle.

The overall length is 6.3 inches, and the finish is plain steel. The pliers are made of high-carbon steel with the head and jaws hardened.

The 3-Ovals marking on these pliers suggests a slightly later production date. This logo appears in advertisements as early as 1901, but was not marked on other examples of early Button's pliers.

Utica Early 8 Inch Button's Pattern Pliers

The next two figures show early Utica Button's pliers in the 8 inch size.

Fig. 12 shows a very early pair of Utica 8 inch Button's pattern wire-cutting pliers, stamped "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." on the lower handle.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel. The pliers are made of high-carbon steel with the head and jaws hardened.

The middle left inset shows a close-up of the jaws, illustrating the angled cutting slot between the jaws. This was typical of early Utica Button's pliers.

The middle right inset shows the underside of the handles, with the parting line from the forging dies clearly visible. The rough finish of the handles suggests an early production date.

These pliers are not marked with the Utica 3-Ovals logo, suggesting an earlier production date.

Fig. 13 shows another very early pair of Utica 8 inch Button's Pattern wire-cutting pliers, stamped "U.D.F.&T.Co." and "Utica, N.Y. U.S.A." on the lower handle.

The overall length is 8.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel, with extensive pitting due to rust.

The middle left inset shows a close-up of the jaws, illustrating the angled cutting slot between the jaws. This was typical of early Utica Button's pliers.

These pliers are not marked with the Utica 3-Ovals logo, suggesting an earlier production date.

Utica Improved Button's Pattern Pliers

By 1906 Utica had introduced a significant improvement to the Button's style by splitting the cutting slot between the jaws into two angled slots, so that the improved pliers offered four cutting slots. This design became the well-known Utica No. 1000 "Giant" Button's Pliers. The provision for two slots between the jaws is described by the 1909 Kellemen patent #942,504.

Although the 1909 Kellemen patent wasn't filed until early in 1909, Utica was definitely producing the improved pliers as early as 1906. These pliers can be seen as the "Giant Buttons Pliers" in the 1906 Utica Advertisement shown earlier in this article. A careful look at that illustration shows a patent applied notice on the underside of the handles, suggesting that the Kellemen patent may have been filed earlier and rejected, then revised and filed successfully in 1909.

Utica Early [No. 1000-8] 8 Inch "Giant" Button's Pattern Pliers

Fig. 14 shows an early pair of Utica [No. 1000-8] 8 inch "Giant" Button's Pattern pliers, stamped with an early 3-Ovals logo on the face, with "Pat. Apd For" and "Giant" plus the 3-Ovals logo forged into the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 8.4 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

Although not marked with a model number, these pliers match the illustration of the No. 1000 "Giant Buttons Pliers" in the 1906 Utica Advertisement shown earlier in this article.

The patent pending status refers to patent #942,504, filed by H.F. Kellemen in 1909 and issued later that year. The patent describes that two angled slots between the jaws (see middle left inset), which allow the pliers to grasp the piece of wire after cutting it.

Utica Early [No. 1000-10] 10 Inch "Giant" Button's Pattern Pliers

Fig. 15 shows an early pair of Utica [No. 1000-10] 10 inch "Giant" Button's Pattern pliers, stamped with the early 3-Ovals logo on the face, with "Pat. Apd For" and the 3-Ovals logo forged into the underside of the handles. (The markings on the underside of the handles are only partially struck, and the "Giant" marking seen in the previous figure is missing from this example.)

The overall length is 10.4 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

Although not marked with a model number, these pliers match the illustration of the No. 1000 "Giant Buttons Pliers" in the 1906 Utica Advertisement shown earlier in this article.

These pliers are described by the Kellemen 1909 patent #942,504, and the patent applied notice on the underside may refer to this patent. The patent describes the two angled cutting slots between the jaws (see middle left inset), which allow the pliers to grasp a piece of wire after cutting it.

Utica Early [No. 1000-6] 6 Inch "Giant" Button's Pattern Pliers

The next two figures show early examples of the Utica 1000 pliers in the 6 inch size.

Fig. 16 shows an early pair of Utica [No. 1000-6] 6 inch "Giant" Button's Pattern wire-cutting pliers, marked with "Pat. Apd For" and "Giant" plus the 3-Ovals logo forged into the underside of the handles (see lower inset).

The overall length is 6.1 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

Although not marked with a model number, these pliers match the illustration of the No. 1000 "Giant Buttons Pliers" in the 1906 Utica Advertisement shown earlier in this article.

The patent pending status refers to patent #942,504, filed by H.F. Kellemen in 1909 and issued later that year. The patent describes that two angled slots between the jaws (see middle inset), which allow the pliers to grasp the piece of wire after cutting it.

Fig. 17 shows another early pair of Utica [No. 1000-6] 6 inch Button's Pattern wire-cutting pliers. The pliers are very worn from extensive use, making the markings difficult to read, but were originally stamped "U.D.F.&T. Co." with "Pat. App. For" across the pivot.

The overall length is 6.2 inches, and the finish is plain steel. The pliers are made of high-carbon steel with the head and jaws hardened.

The patent pending status is refers to patent #942,504, filed by H.F. Kellemen in 1909 and issued later that year. The patent notes that the angled slot opening into the jaws was intended to allow the pliers to grasp the piece of wire after cutting it.

Early Lineman's Pliers

Lineman's pliers are an important style of side-cutting pliers, with the name based on their widespread usage among telephone and electric utility line workers. In the years before 1910, Utica was offering at least three lines of lineman's pliers, the No. 50 basic model, the No. 1950 heavy-duty pliers, and the No. 1650 box-joint pliers.

Utica Early No. 50[-8] 8 Inch Lineman's Pliers

Fig. 18 shows a very early pair of Utica [No. 50] 8 inch lineman's pliers, stamped with an early 3-Ovals logo resembling interlocked chain links.

The overall length is 8.1 inches, and the finish is black oxide.

The use of the "3-Ovals" logo suggests production before 1910, probably in the range 1905-1910.


How to Find Ancestors in Utica Historical Newspapers

There are countless reasons why records for your ancestors may appear in a newspaper. For most people, these could be birth announcements, marriage announcements, or obituaries. All of these records are potentially available via the Utica newspaper archive.

The easiest way to begin working on your family history is to work backward. With potentially thousands of Americans sharing your last name across the state, it’s easy to mistakenly add someone unrelated to your family tree.

Steadily moving through extended family members and using other relatives to fill in the gaps of some of the more elusive members of your bloodline can help you gradually build up your family tree.

Remember, before the advent of the Internet, newspapers were the leading way to disseminate information throughout the community.

Here are some additional tips for narrowing down different newspaper records:

  • Include advanced search techniques, such as Boolean operators and proximity searches.
  • Double-check newspaper entries with any official government records.
  • Use other ancestors to confirm the validity of another. Many death notices will mention other ancestors alongside the deceased.

Utica historic newspapers are a treasure trove of historical knowledge. And you can access centuries’ worth of issues from the comfort of your own home.


Watch the video: Grace VanderWaal - Happy 15th Birthday